Why PMS Gives You Insomnia?

Most nights, Karin Wacaser, 48, a public relations consultant in Dallas, sleeps soundly for about 10 hours. But three days before her period, like clockwork, Wacaser has intense insomnia, waking up every hour or two. “It’s crazy,” she says. “And frustrating. Sometimes I’ll toss and turn for an hour until I can go back to sleep.”At other times, Wacaser lies awake all night, finally falling asleep around 7 a.m.

What is going on? “Each phase of the menstrual cycle has different effects on sleep,” says Michael Breus, PhD, ABSM, WebMD’s sleep expert and author of the “Sleep Well” blog on WebMD.com. Rising and falling levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone, which regulate the menstrual cycle, can affect a woman’s ability to fall and stay asleep — as well as influence the quality of her sleep.

Insomnia and PMS: The Estrogen Connection

According to a 2007 National Sleep Foundation poll, 33% of women say their sleep is disturbed during their menstrual cycles. Another 16% report missing one or more days of work in the past month because of sleep problems. (Altogether, 67% of women report having a sleep problem a few nights a week.)

The menstrual cycle is divided into two main phases: follicular (day one of menstruation to ovulation) and luteal (after ovulation). Kathryn Lee, RN, PhD, associate dean of research at the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing and women’s sleep expert, explains that during the follicular phase, estrogen builds up until ovulation. “Estrogen is almost like an energy supplement,” Breus says. Then at ovulation, around day 14, “estrogen is suddenly kicked up another notch, and we see a tremendous number of sleep disturbances for women.”

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