Can a ketogenic diet really fight depression?

They say you are what eat, and we all know the difference a better diet makes to our complexion and our waistlines. But what about our heads?
An increasing number of scientists are pointing to the Ketogenic diet – similar in nature to the low-carb, high-protein Atkins and Caveman meal plans, which have shown promising results in the treatment of depression and bipolar disorder.
‘It’s a very new field; the first papers only came out a few years ago,’ Michael Berk, a professor of psychiatry at the Deakin University School of Medicine in Australia tells The Washington Post. ‘But the results are unusually consistent, and they show a link between diet quality and mental health.’
A Ketogenic diet typically restricts the intake of carbs to no more than 50g a day. A good rule of thumb is to follow the 60/35/5 rule in which 60 per cent of calories come from fat, 35 per cent from protein, and five per cent from carbs. Grass-fed meat, fish, dairy, nuts and avocado are top of the list in terms of foods that comply.
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