New treatment could be ‘breakthrough’ for vitiligo

How does this treatment work?

Dr. Seemal Desai, a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, explained it this way: “The immune system is attacking the melanocytes, so they go into hiding. Tofacitinib tells them it’s OK to come out of hiding, and the UV light brings them out of hibernation.”

King and his colleagues also reported on a white man in his 50s who had long-standing vitiligo. He had previously received treatment to remove all pigment so he would be uniformly white. But he still had patches of whiter skin on 90 percent of his face. He also had patches on his torso and arms.

After three months of treatment on his face, he had about 50 percent re-pigmentation. After six months, he had about 75 percent re-pigmentation of his face. King was surprised at how effective the treatment was because the man had previously undergone chemical destruction of the pigment cells.

Desai said the findings “look promising, and that new treatment options are great.”

But, he added, this study needs to be replicated in a larger group of people.

And he noted that right now, people will likely have a hard time getting reimbursed for tofacitinib because it’s not approved for treating vitiligo. He didn’t know exact costs but said the drug is quite expensive. Estimates put the drug’s price tag at roughly $2,000 a month.
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