Sjogren’s Syndrome and Trigeminal Neuralgia

To answer the reader’s question, I sent her links to several studies and reputable information sources that do indeed connect Sjogren’s syndrome to this disorder as one of the many neurologic complications of Sjs:

A PRIMER ON THE NEUROLOGICAL
COMPLICATIONS OF SJÖGREN’S
By Julius Birnbaum, MD
Johns Hopkins Neurology-Rheumatology Clinic

“….Sjögren’s syndrome can cause numbness or burning of the face, called “trigeminal neuralgia.” Pain in the back of the throat, which may worsen while swallowing, is called “glossopharyngeal neuralgia.” Patients with trigeminal or glossopharyngeal neuralgia can have agonizing mouth and facial pain. These neuropathies may co-exist with other neuropathies in different parts of the body. For example, up to 20% of patients with a “small-fiber” neuropathy may also have trigeminal neuropathy.
Medicines which may help alleviate symptoms in small-fiber neuropathy may also have efficacy in trigeminal neuralgia. Such medications may include a class of agents which are typically used to treat seizures, and include gabapentin, topiramate, andpregabalin. In seizure disorders, paroxysmal and irregular bursts of electrical activity in brain nerves may lead to propagation of seizures. Similarly, in Sjögren’s neuropathy, irritative electrical signals produced by nerves in the skin instead of the brain, may similarly contribute to pain. Just as anti-seizure medicines can dampen electrical activity of brain cells, the dampening of electrical activity produced by pain-fibers may ameliorate burning pain. It is important to note that use of these symptomatic medications does not target the neuron-inflammation which may be contributing to neuropathy. In such cases, judicious use of immunosuppressant medications should be considered.”
(bolding mine)

Next Page

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*