10 Things You May Not Know About MS (Multiple Sclerosis)

3.  MS is difficult to diagnose and can take YEARS to rule in while ruling out other possibilities.

Yes, I thought a doctor could just look at some blood samples and ask some questions and make some observations and then POOF! you’d have your diagnosis. No. It actually can be a long process. Doctors unfamiliar with MS as well as doctors who are familiar with it can take a long time making a proper diagnosis. And remember, there are varying types of MS called “courses” and each has varying degrees of severity. Then you have each person with their individual symptoms. So while people may guess a person has MS, there are blood tests and biopsies that have to be done by specialists who know what they are supposed to be ruling out before they can rule in MS. It can, and often does, take years to diagnose. MRI (a brain scan) is used to diagnose 90% of all cases at this point in time, but it is still just one of many tests that have to be completed. The MRI only shows swelling.

4.  MS can’t be cured; symptoms can only be lessened and treatments can be extreme.

Although experimental treatments and hopeful research for a cure make headlines, there are no headlines for the fact that people get the disease and then can only hope to manage symptoms and hope to lessen them. If a person with MS is lucky, their MS will lighten up for long periods of time or seem to disappear. It never goes away, but it does not get worse. If the person is unlucky, they get hit hard, don’t get any periods of relief, and continue to worsen even with medication and chemo treatments. The person I have in my life went as far as to have her eye muscles cut so her eyes would stop shaking. The shaking, after doing other treatments, including chemo, had not subsided and she was sick to her stomach from the constant eye movement. Other treatments to stop tremors have included the injection of a neurotoxin to cause partial or complete paralysis of specific muscles; this was done in an effort to regain control so she could walk more confidently and not suffer dizziness and nausea. She was able to gain some quality of life back, however, she never regained full function of anything affected by the MS.
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